Silver Compounds - Facts
Silver Compounds
Name/Formula Mass, g/mol MP°C  BP°C  Density Solubility g/100ml (°C)
Silver Acetate
AgCO2CH3
166.92 d - 3.259 1.02(20) 2.52(80)
white solid - Determination of Ksp experiment
Silver Bromide
AgBr
187.78 158 >1026 6.437 8.4X10-6(20) .00037(100)
bromyrite, pale yellow solid - light sensitive chemical in photography
Silver Carbonate
Ag2CO3
275.75 d 218 - 6.077 .0032(20) .05(100)
yellow solid
Silver Chloride
AgCl
143.32 455 1550 5.56 .000089(10) .0021(100)
White powder, Reagent, Stan-Gray Glass, Silver Plating, Titrations
Silver Fluoride
AgF
126.87 435 1150 5.852 182(15.5) 205(108)
yellow solid, cubic
Silver Hydroxide
AgOH
124.87 - - - - -
tan precipitate - used in anions experiment
Silver Iodide
AgI
234.77 558 - 5.683 2.8X10-7(25) 2.5X10-6(80)
iodyrite, yellow hexagonal - photographic chemical
Silver Nitrate
AgNO3
169.87 212 d 444 4.352 122(0) 952(190)
Analytical Reagent, Mirrors, Swimming Pool biocide, Catalysts, Photography
Silver Oxide
Ag2O
231.74 230 - 7.143 .0013(20) .0053(80)
Silver Tarnish, Batteries, Catalysts, Biocide, Water Purification, Electronics
Silver Phosphate
Ag3PO4
418.58 849 - 6.37 2.8X10-18 -
Used in Photography
Silver Sulfate
Ag2SO4
311.80 652 1085 5.45 0.57(0) 1.41(100)
white, rhombahedral - used in anions experiment
Silver Sulfide
Ag2S
247.8 845 - 7.326 .00002 -
acanthite, gray/black, rhombahedral

Silver Reactions
Silver Reactions:
For each succeeding addition, a more stable silver compound or complex is formed:
  1. Start with 30 drops 0.1 M AgNO3 (1.70 g of AgNO3 in 100 ml water)
  2. Addition of a carbonate source leads to the formation of Silver Carbonate
    Add 1 drop 1 M NaHCO3 (8.4 g Sodium Bicarbonate (NaHCO3) in 100 ml water)
    2 Ag+ + HCO3- --> Ag2CO3 + H+
  3. Silver Phosphate is less soluble than Silver Carbonate:
    Add 5 drops 0.2 M Na3PO4 (3.3 g Sodium Phosphate (Na3PO4) in 100 ml water)
    3 Ag2CO3 + 2 PO43- --> 2 Ag3PO4 + 3 CO32-
  4. Silver Hydroxide is less soluble than Silver Phosphate:
    Add 2 drops 1.0 M NaOH (33 mL 3 M Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) in 100 ml water)
    Ag3PO4 + 3 OH- --> 3 AgOH + PO43-
  5. Silver Chloride is less soluble than Silver Hydroxide:
    Add 5 drops 1 M NaCl (5.844 g Sodium Chloride (NaCl) in 100 ml water)
    AgOH + Cl- --> AgCl + OH-
  6. Silver Chloride dissolves in ammonia:
    Add 25 drops 6.0 M NH3 (40.0 mL 15 M ammonia (NH3) in 100 ml water)
    AgCl + 2 NH3 --> Ag(NH3)2+ + Cl-
  7. Silver Bromide forms from Silver Ammine:
    Add 5 drops 0.1 M KBr (1.19 g Potassium Bromide (KBr) in 100 ml water)
    Ag(NH3)2+ + Br- --> AgBr + 2 NH3
  8. Addition of a source of thiosulfate ions allows the formation of the Silver(I) Thiosulfate complex.
    Add 4 drops 1.0 M Na2S2O3 (24.8 g Sodium Thiosulfate Pentahydrate (Na2S2O3ò5H2O) in 100 ml water)
    AgBr + 2 S2O32- --> Ag(S2O3)23- + Br-
  9. Addition of an iodide source forms Silver Iodide.
    Add 2 drops 0.1 M KI (1.660 g Potassium Iodide (KI) in 100 ml water)
    Ag(S2O3)23- + I- --> AgI + 2 S2O32-
  10. Addition of a sulfide source allows the formation of Silver Sulfide.
    Add 20 drops 0.1 M Na2S - (7.8 g Sodium Sulfide in 100 ml water)
    2 AgI + S2- --> Ag2S + 2 I-
If any of the reagents are added out of sequence, the compounds and complexes missed will never be formed as the predominant species.

From: One Pot Silver Reactions


=== Dont make the following chemicals by mistake: ===
Even a tiny amount is extremely dangerous! THEY WILL SERIOUSLY INJURE YOU.
Fulminating Silver:
Ag2O.(NH3)2 (black crystals) obtained by dissolving silver oxide in aqua ammonia.
When dry it explodes violently on the slightest percussion.
Silver Fulminate:
Ag2C2N2O2 (white crystals) obtained by adding alcohol to a solution of silver nitrate.
When dry it is violently explosive.